Sunday, May 25, 2008

Flames of War 'Objective Markers'


I was just over at John's house playing a friendly game of Flames of War, on Friday night and could not help to notice the great objective markers he was using. The first one shown has been painted by John's good friend Clarky (from Brisbane). The Stalingrad marker is just fantastic and which has already received a lot of great comments on numerous other sites. The painting plus modeling of this piece is spot on - "Bloody Good Clarky" The other objective marker is from John's American Airborne collection, another army which as seen a fair bit of air time on this blog. But I am unsure of the painter.







Anyway enjoy the photos. We are going to play a few great little scenarios, soon , from Flames of War and with John's professionally painted armies. So keep your eyes fixed for the next post.






Thursday, May 8, 2008

The Fall of The West (WAB) - Late Imperial Romans take on the Saxon Hoards


Our second game for the weekend was played on the Monday and was based on 'The Fall of The West' WAB supplement. On one side and looking rather sort on numbers were the Late Romans, commanded by myself, Kevin Jowlett and Oliver Jowlett. On the other side, commanding the Saxon hoard, was John Maguire and Leroy Simpson. Well all started well for the Romans as they advance forward and made their final dispositions, locked shields and waited for the onset of the eventual Saxon charge. That was the only good move we made after that we lost both our flanking cavalry and started to get overlapped by the massive Saxon battleline.



The Roman battleline

Roman heavy cavalry (painted by Andrew Parr).

The Saxon batteline

Saxon troops move forward (figures painted by Leroy)

The we did however manage to make a few small successful dice rolls but the Saxon numbers and their Hun allies went on to finally breaking our shield wall and hitting us in the rear and killing our General. Next time I think we will use the Army Builder and work out proper lists, which might give the old Romans a better chance. But I guess that will depend on my dice rolling.

The Roman lock shields and wait the Saxon charge.

Roman heavy cavalry charges and defeats the lite Saxon cavalry, only to be defeated by the Saxon foot troops.


"Steady boys"


Battlelines clash


The push begins and slowly grinds down the Roman shield wall.
The last straw - The Roman General and his bodyguard are ridden down by the allied Hun heavy cavalry.

Wednesday, May 7, 2008

Images from the 'Tactical Napoleonic Battle' game we played on the weekend




The Austrian Heavy Cavalry Brigade prepares for the charge.

French Reserves march onto the battlefield.


Two French Brigades, one Infantry and the other Light Cavalry strike the Austrian right flank.


French gunners continue their bombardment of the Austrian lines





All was looking good for the French until the Austrian heavies hit a French Brigade in the flank.

Then they through back the French flank attack.

And finally sent in their own flank attack, catching the French light cavalry in the rear and winning the day.

More of John's Collection - Painted by Leroy Simpson

Austrian 6pdr battery


Austrian Cuirassiers Regiment followed by a Dragoon Regiment.


French Hussar Regiment.


Hungarian Musketeer Battalion.

Austrian Ulan Regiment.

All figures shown are from the Elite Miniatures range.

Pictures from Sundays Game - From John's Collection







A Weekend of Gaming


Over the Queensland May Day long weekend the Lonely Gamers Club managed to slip in two big games. On the Sunday we played a large game, of Andrew Parr's, 'Tactical Napoleonic Battle' which is becoming very popular with the boys here in Townsville as a great fast playing Napoleonic wargame. Then on the Monday we played a large 'Fall of the West' Warhammer Ancient Battles game. Both games were hosted by John Maguire and also played in his garage, plus he owns about 80% of the figures used over the two day event -Thanks John. Our numbers for the weekend were not huge but the regulars all turned up for a bash, Leroy Simpson (who painted a large number of the figures used in both games), Oliver and Kevin Jowett from Battleline Scenics (up from the Glass House mountains), Jeff Smith, Brian Buskell and myself.

Elite Miniatures Austrians (painted by Leroy) repel an attack by Two Wargames Foundry French Columns.


From left to right - Brian Buskell, Oliver Jowett and Kevin Jowett (from Battline Scenics) enjoy Andrew Parr's 'Tactical Napoleonic Battle' rules.


Our Napoleonic game, which was played on the Sunday, consisted of five infantry brigades (four battalion each) two cavalry brigades (three regiments each - one light and one heavy) and three batteries of guns for both sides. The opposing forces were French VS Austrian and totaled about 1600 points, using the point system for 'Tactical Napoleonic Battles'. It was a large game with a lot of moving parts. Both sides used flank attacks and the compulsory reserve units, which have to be off the table, but can be rolled for on the first turn of the movement phase. The flank attacks also have to be rolled for but only from the second turn. Just to show how fast the game flows, we started at about 1130am and were finished roughly four hours later and had gained a deceive result. Which does not always happen in other Napoleonic rules.

Blacktree Late Imperial romans (part of Johns' collection)

Mondays game was also huge, with one side playing as Saxons and the other Late Imperial Romans. We did not use the point system for this game from WAB, as we were just keen to get all our painted troops onto the board and play a massive game. The end result was the Romans going down in a big way and the Saxon hoard gaining a victory similar to the Goth victory at Adrianople in 378AD. Plus it was another loss to me.

Imperial Romans go into shieldwall as the Saxon battleline prepares to charge forward.

Anyway we all had a great weekend and got some great pictures of the games, which I will put up on the blog soon. Thanks again to John for hosting the weekend and Kevin for making the trip up to Townsville.